Spring has sprung in the park 🌱

Flowers, wildlife and warmer weather are all on the cards as spring arrives, we’ve put some of our favourite spring moments in a list so you can keep an eye out on your wander.


Butterflies 🦋


Nothing says warmer days are on the way than a butterfly fluttering by as you walk along the river. The family of yellow and white butterflies are normally the first to appear with a Brimstone butterfly being one of the first spotted at Fishers Green this year. The hibernating Peacock Butterflies and the migrating Painted Lady follow them later in spring.

Our tip for getting a photo of our fluttering friends is to make sure you don’t cast a shadow, so they can continue sunbathing while you get your snap. 📷





Great Crested Grebe courting dance 🧡


Birds are busy building nests this time of year preparing for their future chicks and the Great Crested Grebes are no exception. Early spring morning will see pairs rush together chest to chest to exchanging head bobs, beak brushes and the grand finale of weed flicking. This behaviour is to establish a territory on a lake. Some courting pairs have been seen at the Wildlife Discovery Centre and Stanstead Innings.



Bulbs and buds 🌸


You might catch some naturalized Daffs popping up from the ground and branches brimming with buds on your walks through the park, but Myddelton House Gardens is the place to be for spring flora. From the flourishing Alpine Meadow to the budding magnolias dotted around the gardens and the legendary tulip display starting to break through the soil, there’s plenty to see at this hidden gem.



Cuckoo is calling 🎶


Keep an ear out when taking a stroll to hear the undeniable sound of the Cuckoo amongst the trees, ringing in the spring season. They lay their eggs in nests of other birds and are masters of disguise adapting their eggs to look like those of their hosts. Our note for spotting is to keep an eye out after their call has finished as they won’t fly and sing at the same time.



Meadows for May Day 💈


Cowslip is beginning to appear in meadows up and down the Lee Valley. This member of the primrose family can be identified by its bright yellow five petal flowers and was traditionally used in garlands for May Day celebrations. They give wildlife an early source of nectar in the spring and have been spotted in the meadows at Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park.


Make sure you share your sighting with us on our wildlife sights page 🔍

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